Faculty Steering Committee

CDHI

The CDHI Faculty Steering Committee is chaired by Professor Robert C. Allen, who also serves as Co-PI for the Mellon Foundation grant. It is composed of faculty from across the campus who are engaged in digital humanities research, teaching, and public engagement, as well as faculty beyond the humanities whose interests and expertise are relevant to the goals of the CDHI. This committee advises the Provost and Deans on a wide range of University policies and practices in the digital humanities, ensures that the humanities are represented in broader UNC initiatives involving data and information studies, and coordinates digital humanities activities with other universities in the Research Triangle. Members will serve as liaisons between the CDHI and faculty in units across the campus. Sub-committees will work on particular programmatic facets of the initiative, including recruitment of digital humanities faculty and post-doctoral fellows; development of a graduate certificate in digital humanities and an undergraduate minor in data studies.


ROBERT C. ALLEN, CHAIR

American Studies
rallen@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

Bobby Allen is the James Logan Godfrey Distinguished Professor of American Studies, History, and Communication Studies, co-director of the Digital Innovation Lab, and co-principal investigator for the Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative. Going to the Show, his first digital project, was awarded the 2011 Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History by the American Historical Association. Allen regularly teaches a project-based graduate seminar in digital American studies and also incorporates hands-on DH work into his undergraduate courses.

ANNA AGBE-DAVIES
Anthropology
agbe-davies@unc.edu
Faculty page

Anna Agbe-Davies is an historical archaeologist and assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology. Her research focuses on plantation societies of the colonial southeastern US and Caribbean, as well as towns and cities of the 19th and 20th century Midwest, with a particular focus on the African diaspora. As part of her efforts to bring digital methodologies into the classroom, Agbe-Davies is currently exploring crowdsourcing techniques to engage her students in primary research related to a project at Stagville that looks at records stretching from 1792 to 1892 that document transactions at plantation stores owned by the Bennehan-Cameron family.

DANIEL ANDERSON
English and Comparative Literature
iamdan@unc.edu
Faculty page

Dan Anderson is a professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature, where he serves as associate chair. He has built a number of instructional technology tools, including the PITJournal, and directs the Studio for Instructional Technology in English Studies (SITES), which provides instructors in the Department of English and Comparative Literature with opportunities and support as they integrate technologies into their teaching. He serves on the Digital Innovation Lab Advisory Board, and in 2012, he served on the DIL/IAH Faculty Fellows selection committee. He is also Faculty Director of the Graduate Certificate Program in Digital Humanities and Curriculum Coordinator of the Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative.

WILLIAM ANDREWS
English and Comparative Literature
wandrews@unc.edu
Faculty page

Bill Andrews is the E. Maynard Adams Professor of English and former Senior Associate Dean for the Fine Arts and Humanities. Over the years, his research has focused on African American and southern literature and criticism as well as autobiography. In the digital realm, he has served as series editor of North American Slave Narratives, an extensive digital collection affiliated with Documenting the American South at UNC Libraries. Currently, he is scholarly advisor for the Slave Narrative Name Database Project, a project of the Digital Innovation Lab.

LUCIA BINOTTI
Romance Languages
lbinotti@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

Lucia Binotti is a professor of Spanish in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. In 2011, she received an NEH Digital Start-Up Grant for Gnovis: Flowing Through the Galaxy of Knowledge, a project that aims to develop multiple flexible and reusable user interfaces that will allow for the display of large amounts of data organized semantically. Binotti also serves on the Digital Innovation Lab Advisory Board, and in 2012, she served on the DIL/IAH Faculty Fellows selection committee.

W. FITZHUGH BRUNDAGE
History
brundage@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

Fitz Brundage is the William B. Umstead Professor of History. His general research interests are American history since the Civil War, with a particular focus on the American South. In addition to incorporating digital humanities methodologies into his undergraduate teaching, Brundage has served as scholarly advisor for Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina, a digital history project that pulls together a huge body of material–correspondence, postcards, photographs, pamphlets, newspaper articles, interactive maps, oral histories–and organizes it around a common theme: commemoration.

RENEE ALEXANDER CRAFT
Communication Studies
renee.alexander.craft@unc.edu
Faculty page

Renee Alexander Craft is an artist and critical ethnographer whose research focuses on cultural performances of black resistance in the Americas. An assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies and the Curriculum in Global Studies, received one of two inaugural DIL/IAH Faculty Fellowships in support of her digital humanities project, “The Portobelo Digital Oral History Project,” a cultural preservation and collaborative research initiative focused on an Afro-Latin community located in the small coastal town of Portobelo, Panama, who call themselves and their performance tradition “Congo.”

REBECCA DOBBS
Geography
grdobbs@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

Rebecca Dobbs is an alumna of and adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Geography. Her research interests include historical geography, HGIS, and microscale local historical geographies, as well as human settlement, indigenous peoples, the South, and Australia. A founding member of HGIS Carolina, Dobbs also teaches courses that incorporate HGIS to explore local histories through the Lost Chapel Hill project.

CARL W. ERNST
Religious Studies
cernst@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

Carl Ernst is the Kenan Distinguished Professor of Islamic Studies in the Department of Religious Studies, and co-director of the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations. He is also co-editor of Perso-Indica, a critical survey of Persian works on Indian learned traditions

PAUL JONES
School of Information and Library Science
& School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Faculty page

Paul Jones is a clinical professor in the School of Journal and Mass Communication and the School of Information and Library Science. He is also the director of ibiblio.org, a public online library and digital archive with freely available software and information; it is home to one of the largest “collections of collections” on the Internet. He also serves on the Digital Innovation Lab Advisory Board, and in 2012, he served on the DIL/IAH Faculty Fellows selection committee.

TESSA JOSEPH-NICHOLAS
Computer Science
tnicholas@cs.unc.edu
Faculty page

Tessa Joseph-Nicholas holds her PhD in English and Comparative Literature and her MFA in Creative Writing. She is a lecturer in the Department of Computer Science, where she also serves as director of Digital Arts and Humanities Projects. In 2012, Joseph-Nicholas received one of two inaugural DIL/IAH Faculty Fellowships in support of her digital humanities project, “IVI (Inquire, Visualize, Interact),” an effort to design and develop a suite of simple digital humanities-inspired tools that utilize text mining, data visualizations, and social tools to enhance the functionality of existing course and content management systems. She also serves on the Digital Humanities Curriculum Advisory Committee.

MARK KATZ
Music
mkatz@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

Mark Katz is a professor in and chair of the Department of Music and an adjunct professor in the Department of Communication Studies. Katz teaches courses on music and technology, popular music, and modern art music. In 2011, he received support via the IAH Innovation Fund to create a new set of courses, workshops, performances and other events centered on beat-based forms of music in order to cultivate musical exploration and foster musical entrepreneurship among students, developing new forms of music pedagogy in the process.

SETH KOTCH
American Studies
sethkotch@unc.edu
Faculty page

Seth Kotch is Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities in the Department of American Studies, where he conducts research at the intersections of a number of fields and disciplines, most prominently modern American history, digital humanities, and oral history. His digital projects include Mapping the Long Women’s Movement, an effort to empower researchers to explore oral histories in new ways. In addition to working to expand this project to incorporate a wider variety of oral histories, Kotch is also working on a project that will use oral history and documentary material to explore racial geographies in the rural South.

ANSELMO LASTRA
Computer Science
lastra@cs.unc.edu
Faculty page

Anselmo Lastra is a professor in and chair of the Department of Computer Science. His research interests are in the areas of image-based modeling and rendering, graphics hardware architectures, and cultural heritage applications. Over the years, Lastra has built tools to create 3D models of archaeological sites. Most recently, he has worked with Glaire Anderson in the Department of Art to create Digital Munya, an ongoing multidisciplinary effort to visualize the interiors, exteriors and landscape settings of munyas, aristocratic estates that were a key feature of early medieval cities in Islamic Iberia.

MALINDA MAYNOR LOWERY
History
mmaynor@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

Malinda Maynor Lowery is an associate professor in the Department of History. Her research interests include Native American history, southern history, nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. history, historical geography, race and ethnicity, identity, and community-engaged research. She uses GIS to map Lumbee kinship networks in Robeson County, N.C. and often incorporates digital humanities into her undergraduate teaching. She also serves on the Digital Innovation Lab Advisory Board.

TIM MARR
American Studies
marr@unc.edu
Faculty page

Tim Marr is an associate professor in and serves as associate chair of the Department of American Studies. Within the department, he offers courses that cover a wide range of topics, including birth and death, tobacco, captivity, Herman Melville, cultural memory, and mating and marriage. Marr also serves as an executive member of the Melville Society Cultural Project and a contributor to the Melville Electronic Library. He also serves on the Digital Innovation Lab Advisory Board.

JOHN MCGOWAN
English and Comparative Literature
jpm@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

John McGowan is the Ruel W. Tyson, Jr. Distinguished Professor of the Humanities and a founding and active member of the Program in Cultural Studies. He also serves as director of the Institute for the Arts and Humanities at UNC.

LILLY NGUYEN
CDHI Faculty Hire in Women’s and Gender Studies

ELIZABETH ANNE OLSON
Geography
eaolson@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

Betsy Olson is an associate professor in the Department of Geography with a joint appointment in Global Studies. Her research and teaching explores the ways that human organizations and institutions intersect with material, social and political inequalities, and the consequences of this for securing a good life. Her work relies upon methodologies that are participatory, largely ethnographic, and increasingly integrated with new media both in the production of data and for the purpose of engaging interested audiences. She also serves on the Digital Humanities Curriculum Advisory Committee.

MORGAN PITELKA
Asian Studies
mpitelka@unc.edu
Faculty page

Morgan Pitelka is an associate professor in the Department of Asian Studies, an adjunct associate professor in the Department of History, and director of the Triangle Center for Japanese Studies. His research focuses on the history and material culture of the long sixteenth century in Japan. He is project leader on “Campus Curators: Experiential Learning and Digital Collaboration,” an effort to institutionalize collaborative relationships between academic departments in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Ackland Art Museum in order to make the museum more accessible through online collections and crowdsourcing media technologies.

JEFFREY POMERANTZ
School of Information and Library Science
pomerantz@unc.edu
Faculty page

Jeff Pomerantz is an associate professor in the School of Information and Library Science, where he also serves as director of undergraduate studies. Pomerantz teaches courses on information retrieval, digital libraries, and information resources and services; much of his own research has been on digital reference services.

MICHELLE ROBINSON
American Studies
mmrobins@unc.edu
Faculty page

Michelle Robinson is an assistant professor in the Department of American Studies. Her areas of interest include detective and crime fiction, film studies, YA fiction, 19th and 20th century sectarian religious movements, and LGBTQ literature and film. Robinson regularly incorporates digital projects into her courses, and in fall 2013 students in her class on Women and Detective Fiction collaborated with the Digital Innovation Lab to build the Nancy Drew Digital Project.

TERRY RHODES, EX OFFICIO
Department of Music
rhodes@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

Terry Rhodes is a professor in the Department of Music and Senior Associate Dean for Fine Arts and Humanities in the College of Arts and Sciences. She is Co-PI of the “Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative: Innovating Academic Practice in the Humanity,” an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant.

JOYCE RUDINSKY
Communication Studies
rudinsky@unc.edu
Faculty page

Joyce Rudinsky is an artist and associate professor in the Department of Communication Studies and Associate Director, Digital Arts and Humanities at the Institute for the Arts and Humanities. Her visual and electronic art is often interactive and examines how technology changes people’s perceptions and the way they experience and interact with art and other human artifacts. As RENCI Faculty Fellow from 2007-2008, Rudinsky created Spectacular Justice, a multimedia installation that examined the death penalty from a variety of perspectives. Details about more of her digital media work are available at www.rudinsky.com. She also serves on the Digital Humanities Curriculum Advisory Committee.

GEOFF SAYRE-MCCORD
Philosophy
sayre-mccord@unc.edu
Faculty page

Geoff Sayre-McCord is the Morehead-Cain Alumni Distinguished Professor in Philosophy and former chair of the department. He is also director of the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program at UNC. Within philosophy, his interests include metaethics, moral theory, political philosophy, epistemology and metaphysics.

RYAN SHAW
School of Information and Library Science
ryanshaw@unc.edu
Faculty page

Ryan Shaw is an assistant professor in the School of Information and Library Science. He regularly teaches courses on information organization, web architecture, and the digital humanities. In 2012, he received an IMLS grant for “Contours of the Past,” a three-year effort to create tools for understanding collections of oral histories through computational text processing techniques. He also serves on the Digital Humanities Curriculum Advisory Committee.

VINCAS STEPONAITIS
Anthropology / Archaeology
vin@unc.edu
Faculty page

Vin Steponaitis is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology and director of the Research Laboratories of Archaeology. Since the 1990s, Steponaitis has explored the frontiers of digital publication in archaeology. Major projects include Excavating Occaneechi Town, Lower Mississippi Survey Archives Online and Early Maps of the American South. He also serves on the Professional Advisory Panel for Digital Antiquity, an initiative dedicated to the digital preservation of archaeological information.

RICHARD TALBERT
History
talbert@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

Richard Talbert is the William Rand Kenan, Jr. Professor in the Department of History. He also serves on the advisory board of the Ancient World Mapping Center, an interdisciplinary research center that promotes cartography, historical geography, and geographic information science as essential disciplines within the field of ancient studies through innovative and collaborative research, teaching, and community outreach activities. In 2012-2013, he chaired the search committee for the first CDHI Post-Doctoral Fellow.

WHITNEY TRETTIEN
CDHI Faculty Hire in English and Comparative Literature

JOE VISCOMI
English and Comparative Literature
sviscom@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

Joe Viscomi is the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of English and co-creator and co-editor of the William Blake Archive, a hypermedia archive that provides unified access to Blake’s major works of visual and literary art. In 2003, it became the first electronic resource to receive the Prize for a Distinguished Scholarly Edition from the Modern Language Association. He also serves on the Digital Humanities Curriculum Advisory Committee.

ANNE WHISNANT
American Studies, History
anne_whisnant@unc.edu
Faculty page

Anne Whisnant serves as the Deputy Secretary of the Faculty in the Office of Faculty Governance and holds appointments as adjunct associate professor in the Department of American Studies and the Department of History. Since 2009, Whisnant has worked in conjunction with UNC Libraries on her own digital history project, Driving Through Time: The Digital Blue Ridge Parkway. She regularly incorporates digital humanities project work into her Introduction to Public History course and also serves on the Digital Humanities Curriculum Advisory Committee.

NADIA YAQUB
Asian Studies
yaqub@email.unc.edu
Faculty page

Nadia Yaqub is an associate professor in the Department of Asian Studies, where she also serves as associate chair and director of undergraduate studies. She is interested in creating a “Palestine in Lebanon” digital archive of photographs and film footage to document, preserve, and provide access to material related to the role of women in creating the Bayt Atfal al-Sumud (BAS), or the Home for Steadfast Children, in the Tal al-Za’atar Palestinian refugee camp in Beirut.