Fall 2016 Course Listings

Fall 2016


Duke University

DOCST 365S / 765S: The Documentary Turn: Southern Cultures
Bernie Herman and Wesley Hogan, W 3:30-5:50pm
Cross-listings: VMS 365S, AMI 365S
In the 20th century, oral history, photography, film and ethnographies brought into existence narratives that would never otherwise have existed. Documentary as a discipline was central to bearing witness. “The Documentary Turn: Southern Cultures” offers an ongoing conversation focused on the proposition of the “documentary turn” in the 21st century. Information flows and new technologies have changed the documentary enterprise in fundamental ways that open new possibilities and challenge continuing conventions. The rise of digital platforms, crowd-sourced communications, and viral information test the very nature of what documentary practices entail. The documentary turn questions fundamental understandings of what it means to be a documentarian. Our conversation begins with questions of creativity, witness, voice, purpose, and evidence.

ISS 544L: Digital Archeology
Maurizio Forte, TuTh 10:05-11:20am

ISIS 580S: Historical and Cultural Visualization Proseminar
Mark Olson, M 3:05-5:35pm

ISIS 590S: Media: Data and Experience
Mark Hansen, W 3:05-5:36pm

Other DH Courses (Do not count toward CDHI Graduate Certificate.)
ISIS 315S: Historical GIS
Tim Shea, MW 10:05-11:20am

ISIS 320S: Intro to Interaction Design in Unity 3D
Dave Zielinski, Tu 4:55-7:25pm

North Carolina State University

ENG 583 Studies in Composition and Rhetoric
Ding, 3 credits, Mo 1:30 – 4:15pm, 00012 Winston Hall
Recent topics have included: Digital Media Theory, Introduction to Humanities Physical Computing, and Emerging Genres

ENG 587 Interdisciplinary Studies in English: Introduction to Digital Humanities
Topic: Thinking with Things: Multimod

Burgess, 3 credits, TH 6:00-7:15pm, 125 Tompkins Hall
An introduction to the field, methods, tools, and professional landscape of digital humanities in practice.

CRD 702 Rhetoric and Digital Media
Gallagher, 3 credits, Mo 6:00-8:45pm, 125 1911 Buiilding
Intensive critical study and evaluation of the conceptual vocabulary of rhetoric and its application to digital communication and digital media. Focus may include the following concepts: community, genre, figuration, argument, narrative, dialogue, deliberation, topoi, pathos, ethos, kairos.

HI 534 The Theory and Practice of Digital History
3 credits, T 3:00-5:45pm, 243 Withers Hall
Introduces students to the theory and practice of digital history. Students will examine theoretical scholarship on digital practices in history, exploring issues of capacity, accessibility, interactivity, and hypertextuality. Students will critique examples of digital history including digital archives, exhibits, scholarships, and teaching resources, and then apply conceptual knowledge in the creation of their own digital history projects.

COM 537 Gaming and Social Networks
Taylor, 3 credits, W 1:30-4:15pm, 213 Winston Hall
Exploration of inter-relations among mobile technologies (cell phones, PDAs), location-based activities, and playful/social spaces. Investigates: (1) the definition of basic gaming concepts (community, narrative, play, and space); (2) the history of games as social environments, with particular emphasis on multi-user domains (MUDs); and (3) the definition of games, which use the physical space as the game environment, such as pervasive games, location-based games, and hybrid reality games. Discussion of inter-connections among games, education, and art.

CSC 116 Introduction to Computing – Java
8 sections, date, time, and instructor vary, 3 credits
An introductory course in computing in Java. Emphasis on algorithm development and problem solving. Careful and methodical development of Java applications and applets from specifications; documentation and style; appropriate use of control structures; classes and methods; data types and data abstraction; object-oriented programming and design; graphical user interface design.

CSC 281 Foundations of Interactive Game Design
Julio, 3 credits, MoWe 9:35 – 10:25am, 434 Daniels Hall
Surveys history, technology, narrative, ethics, and design of interactive computer games. Work in teams to develop novel game designs and computer games. Introduction to the interplay of narrative, technology, rule systems, play and culture in the creation of interactive games. Programming experience not required.

ADN 502 Advanced Visual Laboratory
11 sections, date, time, and instructor vary, 3 credits
ADN 502 is a general title of Advanced Visual Laboratories under the supervision of an Art and Design faculty member to provide intensive experimental work in various phenomena and disciplines related to design.

ADN 503 Graduate Seminar in Art and Design
2 sections, date, time, and instructor vary, 3 credits
Seminar introduction to research in art and design, addressing theoretical, historical, and methodological contexts for individual exploration. Reading, discussion, and presentations will emphasize current work and concept development in all art media. Methods of examining idea sources, process, documentation, critiquing, speaking, and writing about visual concepts.

ECI 511 Computer Applications and Curriculum Integration
Distance Education, 3 credits
Foundational study of technology integration standards, models, and conditions informed by research. Analysis of micro classroom and macro school/institutional technology plans, and development of sample technology plans and projects representative of integration across curricular areas.

ECI 514 Multimedia Design and Applications in Instruction
Distance Education, Micahel Evans, 3 credits
Examination of learning theories and research-based principles for multimedia design to select/apply appropriate digital resources and create maximally effective educational products.

ECI 515 Online Collaborations in Education
Distance Education, Kevin Oliver, 3 credits
Examination of models of collaboration, sample online collaborative strategies and projects, tools supportive of cross-classroom collaborations, and research findings from collaborative initiatives.

ECI 546 New Literacies and Media
2 sections, date, time, and instructor vary,3 credits
Critical analysis of new literacies that are prompted by emerging technologies and participatory media in K-12. Design and application of new literacies and media instructional practices to literacy curriculum and other discipline areas.

UNC, Chapel Hill

AMST 498: The Documentary Turn
Bernie Herman and Wesley Hogan, W 3:30-5:50pm
In the 20th century, oral history, photography, film and ethnographies brought into existence narratives that would never otherwise have existed. Documentary as a discipline was central to bearing witness. “The Documentary Turn: Southern Cultures” offers an ongoing conversation focused on the proposition of the “documentary turn” in the 21st century. Information flows and new technologies have changed the documentary enterprise in fundamental ways that open new possibilities and challenge continuing conventions. The rise of digital platforms, crowd-sourced communications, and viral information test the very nature of what documentary practices entail. The documentary turn questions fundamental understandings of what it means to be a documentarian. Our conversation begins with questions of creativity, witness, voice, purpose, and evidence.

COMM 635-001: Documentary Production
Haslett, TuTh 12:30pm-1:45pm, Swain Hall 106A
Prerequisite, COMM 230. A workshop in the production of video and/or film nonfiction or documentary projects. The course will focus on narrative, representational, and aesthetic strategies of documentary production.

COMM 638-001: Game Design
Rudinsky, TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm, Swain Hall 101A
Prerequisite, COMM 150. Permission of the instructor for non-majors. Studio course that explores gaming critically and aesthetically. Practice in game design and production including three-dimensional worlds and scripting.

COMM 644: Documentary Production
TBA, TuTh 11:00-12:15pm, Swain Hall 106A

COMP 775-001: Image Processing & Analysis
TBA, TuTh 12:30-1:45pm, Fred Brooks Hall, F007
Considerable prior experience in programming and mathematics is absolutely necessary for success in grad-level Computer Science courses.
Instructor permission required

ENGL 674: Digital Literature
Anderson, TuTh 3:30-4:45pm, Greenlaw 316
Digital literature explores how literary works are composed for, shaped by, and studied in electronic environments. Course texts range from books to electronic fiction and poetry to video games. Hands-on activities give students a chance to develop their own literary projects—either as electronic literary works or as digital scholarship.

GEOG 491-001: Introduction to GIS
491-001: Chen, M 3:35-6:35pm, Fred Brooks Hall F009
491-601, Chen, W 2:30-3:20pm, Carolina Hall 322
491-602, Chen, M 11:15-12:05pm, Carolina Hall 322
491-603, Chen, W 1:25-2:15pm, Carolina Hall 322
Prerequisite, GEOG 370. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Stresses the spatial analysis and modeling capabilities of organizing data within a geographic information system. (GISci)

GEOG 592-001: Geographic Information Science Programming
Liang, TuTh 9:30-10:45am, Carolina Hall 322
Prerequisite, GEOG 370 or 491. This course will teach students the elements of GISci software development using major GIS platforms. Students will modularly build a series of applications through the term, culminating in an integrated GIS applications program.

GEOG 594-001: Global Positioning Systems and Applications
Liang, TuTh 2:00-3:15pm, Carolina Hall 322
Prerequisite, GEOG 370. Global Positioning Systems (GPS) fundamental theory, application design, post processing, integration of GPS data into GIS and GPS application examples (such as public health, business, etc.) will be introduced.

HIST 671 (Cross-listed: AMST 671): Introduction to Public History
Whisnant, TuTh 5:00-6:15pm, Carolina Hall 322
Introduces the theory, politics, and practice of historical work conducted in public venues (museums, historic sites, national parks, government agencies, archives), directed at public audiences, or addressed to public issues.

HIST 890-02: Introduction to Digital Humanities
Saldana, Th 5:00-7:00pm, Global Center 3033
This graduate seminar is designed to introduce students to the theories and methods of the digital humanities, with particular emphasis on digital history. We begin with an overview of DH from its roots post-WWII to the present, and proceed to the emerging practices, theoretical underpinnings and disciplinary paradigms of the young field. In keeping with the digital humanities’ commitment to experimentation, public discourse, and praxis, we will compile a web presence for our seminar that includes blog posts from students that engage with the discussions and readings. A series of tutorials will provide hands-on experience with a range of common digital humanities tools. The seminar will culminate in a final project in which students apply DH methodologies to their own research interests.

INLS 520-001: Organization of Information
Losee, MW 8:00-9:15am, Manning 1
Feinberg, TuTh 12:30-1:45pm, Manning 208
Maron, Th 2:00-4:45am, Manning 1
Introduction to the problems and methods of organizing information, including information structures, knowledge schemata, data structures, terminological control, index language functions, and implications for searching.

INLS 523-001: Introduction to Database Concepts and Applications
Capra, TuTh 9:30-10:45am, Manning 307
Haas, TBA
TBA, Th 2:00-4:45pm, Manning 208
Pre- or corequisite, INLS 161 or 461. Design and implementation of basic database systems. Semantic modeling, relational database theory, including normalization, indexing, and query construction, SQL.

INLS 525: Electronic Records Management
Lee, W 12:20-3:05pm, Manning 117
Explores relationships between new information and communication technologies and organizational efforts to define, identify, control, manage, and preserve records. Considers the importance of organizational, institutional and technological factors in determining appropriate recordkeeping strategies.

INLS 534: Youth and Technology in Libraries
Hughes-hassell, F 9:00-11:45am, Manning 307
This course encourages students to explore the array of technologies available to children and adolescents, the issues surrounding the use of technology, the role of care givers, and potential impacts on development.

INLS 560: Programming for Information Science
Boone, TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm, Manning 117
Introduction to programming and computational concepts. Students will learn to write programs using constructs such as iteration, flow control, variables, functions, and error handling. No programming experience required. Offered fall and spring.

INLS 561: Digital Forensics for the Curation of Digital Collections
TBA

INLS 613: Text Mining
Arguello, MW 1:50-3:05pm, Manning 307
This course will allow the student to develop a general understanding of knowledge discovery and gain a specific understanding of text mining. Students will become familiar with both the theoretical and practical aspects of text mining and develop a proficiency with data modeling text. Offered annually.

INLS 620: Web Information Organization
Shaw, TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm, Manning 14
Prerequisites, INLS 520 or 560. Similar programming background needed. Understand the Web as a platform for information organization systems. Learn how the Web has been designed to be a service platform, data publishing platform, and application platform.

INLS 690-189: Big Data, Algorithms, and Society
M, 12:20-3:05pm

INLS 690-246: Digital Textual Scholarship: An Introduction to Text Encoding,
Text Editing, and Distant Reading.

Hill, Th 2:00-4:45, Manning 14
The course will serve as an introduction to a number of problems/research questions in the field of digital textual scholarship. Issues covered include text encoding, digital scholarly editing, the creation of custom corpora, distant reading techniques, and natural language processing. No programming background is required, although we will do some programming in class. By the end of the course, students will have read a number of seminal articles in the field, encoded a text in TEI, created their own custom corpus, and done some basic textual analysis on their corpus.

INLS 700: Scholarly Communication
Hemminger, TuTh 11:00-12:15, Manning 303
Addresses how scholarship is communicated, shared, and stored. Includes scholars approach to academic work; social relationships within academia; external stakekholders in the scholarly communication system; and emerging technologies’ impact upon work practices. Topics covered include academic libraries and presses, publishing, serials crisis, open access, peer review and bibliometrics. Offered in the fall

INLS 720-01W: Metadata
Feinberg, Online
Examines metadata in the digital environment. Emphasizes the development and implementation of metadata schemas in distinct information communities and the standards and technological applications used to create machine understandable metadata. Explores the limits of metadata standards and critically examines the inevitable role of interpretive diversity for information systems. Our semester-long project will engage the challenge of designing and implementing standards and guidelines for interoperable metadata while acknowledging the messy reality of interpretive diversity.

INLS 752: Digital Preservation and Access
Tibbo, T 2:00-4:45, Manning 208

MUSC 676: Digital Media & Live Performance
Megel, MW 5:45-7:00pm, Swain Hall 110

Other DH Courses (Do not count toward CDHI Graduate Certificate.)
HNRS 353: Social Network Analysis and Conspiracy Theories
Horne, TBA
This course introduces social networks, network modeling, and critically engages the literature and history of conspiracy theory. We will cover six conspiracy theories as a means to explore network analysis concepts. No advanced knowledge of mathematics or computer software is required or expected. By the end of this course, students will be able to construct an interactive network graph, perform basic network analysis, and will present their findings in a web application. In addition, students will familiarize themselves with social and political implications of conspiracy theories and their historical veracity.