Spring 2013


Duke University


ISIS 170: Artificial Life, Culture, and Evolution

Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Nicholas Gessler
Tues/Thurs 10:05-11:20am, 11:45am-1pm
Perkins LINK TBA

ISIS 240: Fundamentals of Web-Based Multimedia Communications
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Richard Lucic
Tues/Thurs 1:25-2:40pm
Social Sciences 229
&
Instructor: Florian Wiencek
Wednesday 1:40-4:10pm
Social Sciences 229

ISIS 251: Spanish Literature of the Renaissance and the Baroque: Golden Age Drama
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Margaret Greer
Mon/Wed 11:45am-1pm
Languages 305

ISIS 283: Cultural History of the Televisual
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Mastewal Mellese
Mon/Wed 3:05-4:20pm
Smith Warehouse, Bay 12, Room 101

ISIS 351S: Digital Storytelling
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Mastewal Mellese
Tues/Thurs 8:30-9:45am
Smith Warehouse, Bay 12, Room 228

ISIS 376: Performance and Technology: Composition Workshop
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Martin Brooke, Thomas Defrantz, Tyler Walters
Tues/Thurs 11:45am-1pm
TBA

ISIS 380S: Digital Cities: Representing the Past and Building the Future
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Florian Wiencek
Tuesday 1:40-4:10pm
Smith Warehouse, Bay 12, Room 101

ISIS 390: Social Science and Literature
Undergraduate Course
Instructors: Cathy Davidson, Dan Ariely
Monday 3:05-5:35pm
Physics 259

LIT 490S: Wikipedia and Its Ancestors
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Mattia Begali
Wed/Fri 1:25-2:40pm
Languages 305

The information overload that characterizes our world compels us to develop a more critical and creative approach to how we manage, collect and share information. Wikipedia is one of the most influential and emblematic ways of gathering information and producing knowledge in the digital age.

But how is Wikipedia any different from traditional encyclopedic projects?

In this class we will explore Wikipedia from the inside out, joining its community as editors rather than simply users. Once we are familiar with its inner workings, we will trace the historical roots of Wikipedia, locating it in the constellation of other Western attempts to achieve universal knowledge. This dual approach will not only make visible the hidden assumptions that drive Wikipedia, but also allow us to rethink the history of encyclopedic knowledge from a contemporary perspective.

We will explore Wikipedia and the history of encyclopedias through both traditional and innovative new ways of scholarly inquiry. Through in-class workshops, we will begin to practice methods for text analysis and data visualization currently being developed for use in cutting edge digital humanities scholarship. We will apply these methods to our own studies of digitalized encyclopedias (Diderot and D’Alembert’s Encyclopédie) and digital encyclopedias (Wikipedia). Assigned readings will offer a variety of academic approaches to the problem of encyclopedic knowledge, from philosophies of information (Luciano Floridi) to intellectual history (Daston), the sociology of science (Shapin and Latour), and semiotics (Eco and Kress). Through visits to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library, we will examine historical editions of encyclopedias and consider how these books might have functioned as tangible objects in past centuries. Class assignments include creating original Wikipedia entries, writing short regular blog posts, and completing a 15-page research paper on an encyclopedic project of your choosing.

VMS 89S: Mapping and Modeling Early Modern Venice
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Kristin Huffman Lanzoni
Mondays 10:05am-12:35pm
Smith Warehouse Bay 12 Room 228

Beginning with Napoleon’s forced entry into the city in 1797 and the fall of a more than 1000 year old Republic, the urban landscape of Venice experienced notable change. Significant intervention included the destruction of many Renaissance monuments and, therefore, great loss to the architectural and artistic patrimony of the city. The goal of this Wired! course is to map the urban landscape of early modern Venice by re-constructing lost architectural gems of the fifteenth and sixteenth century along with their immediate surroundings. To accomplish this, students will work in groups to use digital tools, such as Google Sketch up, to translate historical and modern maps, prints, engravings and paintings into 3-D models. In addition to the exterior reconstruction of the buildings, students will use inventories and various imagery to recreate interior spaces. These monuments will be mapped onto present-day Venice. The course assumes no prior art historical or digital experience; students will be provided with the background necessary to understand the art and architectural history of early modern Venice, and the skills required for the digital technology. The outcome of the course will be an unprecedented reconfiguration of aspects of Venice as it appeared in the Renaissance and visual models that may be shared with a larger academic community.

VMS 551LS: Wired! New Representational Technologies / Archaeology of Ancient Britain
Graduate Course
Instructor: Rebecca Bennett
Monday 11:45am-12:45pm in Social Science 229
& Thursdays 4:40-6:10pm in Smith Warehouse Bay 12 Room 228

This course will take you on a journey through the development of human society and culture in the British Isles before written records began. From the first migratory hunters to the Roman conquest, we will examine the key themes of settlement and society of ancient communities through an exploration of the tools and techniques available to archaeologists. Students will have the opportunity to hone their detective skills, piecing together various forms of evidence into cogent stories of the past using various Wired! technologies including GIS, GoogleEarth and Sketch-up. Students will demonstrate their understanding by drawing on digital archives and materials to re-interpret an archaeological investigation of their choice in an innovative and engaging way.

In association with this course there is an opportunity for students to participate in an archaeological landscape assessment at Exmoor National Park, UK during the Spring Break.

A Bold Experiment in Integrated Learning: A Meta-MOOC
Undergraduate & Graduate Courses (See below.)
Instructors: Dan Ariely & Cathy Davidson

Part of this will be face-to-face courses for Duke students, but the excitement comes from the open structure that means we are hoping to be joined by anyone anywhere in the world, not for a conventional MOOC (Massive Online Open Learning) where talking heads tell you what they think but in a Meta-MOOC: a class where we think about how we think, learn about how we learn, collaborate on new collaborative management practices, and together actually create a platform for colearning with a “massive” group of interested others worldwide. This experiment is for anyone frustrated about MOOC’s being billed as “revolutionary” learning when, too often, MOOCs simply are a video of the most conventional old-school form of teaching: the lecture. More information about the course can be found here.

Undergraduate Duke students should enroll in English 390-5/ISIS 390: Surprise Endings Social Science and Literature. Graduate students at Duke and across the Triangle should sign up for English 890S/ISIS 890S: Web Literacies, Digital Knowledge, and Digital Humanities: Theories, Methods, and Tools for Research and Teaching.

North Carolina Central University

LSIS 5425: Organization of Information
Graduate Course
Instructor: Eun Young Lee
Tuesday 6-8:30pm
LIB 337
&
Instructor: Ravonne Green
Online

LSIS 5440: Data Mining with Statistical Analysis Applications
Graduate Course
Instructor: Gyesi Amaniampong
Wednesday 6-8:30pm
LIB 324

LSIS 5451: Database Systems
Graduate Course
Instructor: Gabriel Peterson
Tuesday 6:30-9pm
TBA

LSIS 5452: Advanced Database Systems
Graduate Course
Instructor: Thomas Terrell
Monday 6-8:30pm
LIB 218

LSIS 5460: Expert Systems
Graduate Course
Instructor: Deborah Swain
Monday 6-8:30pm
LIB 337

LSIS 5614: Information Technologies in Education
Graduate Course
Instructor: Edna Cogdell
Online

LSIS 5820: Metadata Analysis
Graduate Course
Instructor: Deborah Swain
Online

LSIS 5830: Metadata Applications for Digital Libraries
Graduate Course
Instructor: Amy Rudersdorf
Tuesday 6-8:30pm
LIB 338

North Carolina State University

Send in your suggestions!

University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill


AMST 840: Digital Humanities/Digital American Studies

Graduate Course
Instructor: Robert Allen
Wednesday 6-8:50pm
Howell 103

ANTH 419: Anthropological Applications of GIS
Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Colin West
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 11-11:50am
Saunders 322

COMP 101: Fluency in Information Technology
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Pozefsky
Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:45am
Brooks Computer Science Building 009

COMP 110: Introduction to Programming
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Hedlund
Mon/Wed/Fri 10-10:50am
Sitterson Room 0014
&
Instructor: Hedlund
Mon/Wed/Fri 1-1:50pm
Sitterson Room 0014
&
Instructor: Staff
Mon/Wed/Fri 9-9:50am
F Brooks Sitterson Room F007
&
Instructor: Staff
Tues/Thurs 11am-12:15pm
Sitterson Room 0011

COMP 185: Serious Games
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Pozefsky
Mon/Wed 10-11:15am
Brooks Computer Science Building 007

COMP 380: Computers and Society
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Nicholas
Tues/Thurs 11am-12:15pm
Brooks Computer Science Building 007

HIST/AMST/ANTH 234: Tribal Studies: Lumbee History
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Malinda Maynor-Lowery
Tues 3:30-6pm
Phillips Room 228

This service-learning course will examine the history of the Lumbee and Tuscarora people whose homeland is in Robeson County, North Carolina, beginning in the 1500s up to the present. Topics discussed include the effects of early exploration and colonization, the coming together of these groups from multiple Indian groups, their histories in major colonial and United States wars, and how the Lumbee and Tuscarora experience reflects the American nation as a whole. Students will conduct original research in an online format, in collaboration with members of these communities, and a field trip will be required.

INLS 490-186: Web Information Organization
Graduate Course
Instructor: Ryan Shaw
Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:45am
Manning 304

INLS 509: Information Retrieval
Graduate Course
Instructor: Jaime Arguello
Mon/Wed 9:30-10:45am
Manning 307

INLS 512: Applications of Natural Language Processing
Graduate Course
Instructor: Stephanie Haas
Mon/Wed 9:30-10:45am
Graham Memorial 213

INLS 520: Organization of Information
Graduate Course
Instructor: Jane Greenberg
Wednesday 12:30-3:15pm
Manning 304

INLS 520: Organization of Information
Graduate Course
Instructor: Sarah Ramdeen
Mon/Wed 3:30-4:45pm
Murray Hall G205

INLS 523-001: Database Systems I
Graduate Course
Instructor: Capra
Tues/Thurs 12:30-1:45pm
Manning 307

INLS 523-002: Database Systems I
Graduate Course
Instructor: Boone
Thursday 2-4:45pm
Global Center 3024

INLS 541: Information Visualization
Graduate Course
Instructor: Brad Hemminger
Mon/Wed 11am-12:15pm
Manning 307

INLS 572: Web Development I
Graduate Course
Instructor: Hassell
Thursday 6-8:45pm
Manning 208

INLS 582: Systems Analysis
Graduate Course
Instructor: Shearer
Mon/Wed 3:30-4:45pm
Manning 208

INLS 623: Database II
Graduate Course
Instructor: Arcot Rajasekar
Mon/Wed 9:30-10:45am
Manning 304

INLS 718: User Interface Design
Graduate Course
Instructor: Bergquist
Mon/Wed 9:30-10:45am
Manning 208

INLS 740: Digital Libraries
Graduate Course
Instructor: Jeff Pomerantz
Mon/Wed 11am-12:15pm
Wilson Library 304

INLS 760: Web Databases
Graduate Course
Instructor: Capra
Tuesday 6-8:45pm
Manning 208

JOMC 187: Introduction to Interactive Multimedia
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Desloge
Mon/Wed 7-8:50pm
CA 59
&
Instructor: Kirkman
Tues/Thurs 9-10:50am
CA 60

Learn HTML, CSS and WordPress; understand basics of Interactive design from Wireframes to Color Comprehensive Layouts to Static Code to Dynamic Code; learn basis of visual design and presentation on the web; and gain an overview of current issues such as privacy, responsive vs. adaptive design, SOPA, etc.

JOMC 581: Multimedia Design
Graduate & Advanced Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Laura Ruel
Mon/Wed 1-2:50pm
CA 60

Basics of Illustrator for web design; usability and user experience; and usability testing.

JOMC 582: Interactive Multimedia Narratives
Graduate & Advanced Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Stevens
Mon/Wed 11am-12:50pm
CA 60

JOMC 583: Multimedia Programing and Production
Graduate & Advanced Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Steven King
Mon/Wed 1-2:50pm
CA 59

Understand big data; visualization and data presentation; intro to Python as relates to Django; and build Django Database Applications. Requirements: Above classes or proficiency in HTML/CSS and JavaScript. (Permission required.)

JOMC 584: Documentary Multimedia Storytelling
Graduate & Advanced Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Davison
Tues/Thurs 3-4:50pm
CA 60

JOMC 586: Intermediate Interactive Multimedia
Graduate & Advanced Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Steven King
Mon/Wed 9-10:50am
CA 60

Learn basics of JavaScript; learn basic programing concepts (Problem solving using loops, arrays, ifs, etc.); implement jQuery plugins and write basic jQuery functions; and use AJAX to build dynamic websites. Requirements: JOMC 187 or proficiency in HTML and CSS. (Permission required.)

JOMC 712: Visual Communication and Multimedia
Graduate Course
Instructor: Charles Floyd
ONLINE

Focusing on the new communication technologies that have created new media, new language and new visual interfaces, this course introduces the student to principles and concepts of visual communication and design and how they are being used in this new cyber medium. Students will learn the rich history of visual images and the conceptual framework of visual communication.

They will examine elements of visual images to learn basic design theory and techniques. These visual information concepts will then be applied to the Internet. Students will learn to analyze how diverse visual elements are used in graphics and graphics design, page design, site planning and navigation, and computer system and human interface design, as well as usability, navigation and accessibility. This course is offered online. JOMC 712 is open to non-JOMC graduate students on a space-available basis.

JOMC 782: Multimedia Storytelling
Graduate Course
Instructor: Laura Ruel
Tues/Thurs 3-4:50pm
CA 59

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the theories and practices of multimedia content creation. Students will read and view scholarly and professional works that address multimedia presentation methods. They will be expected to gain a critical understanding of the value of each media form. In addition, they will learn how to apply this knowledge by creating a multimedia storytelling project that will unfold throughout the semester.