Fall 2013


Duke University


Art History 190FS: Splendor of the City: The Art and Architecture of Renaissance Venice

Undergraduate Course, Freshman Focus
Instructor: Kristin Huffman Lanzoni

Residents of Venice, both individually and collectively, fashioned an image of the city as unprecedented and exceptional, accomplishing this in great part through art and architecture. Venice was indeed unique— a city built on water after all— and sponsors commissioned monuments as a way to promote the city as unparalleled in beauty, splendor, and glory. Students will use digital tools, such as Omeka/Neatline, to map artistic connections across the urban landscape of Venice and its territories during Renaissance. By considering a range of artistic patronage, a wide spectrum of art commissions, and a number of the most famous artists, this course will offer a broad picture of this thriving period of Venetian art and society.


CLST 252S: Reconstructing Ancient Worlds

Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Mauizio Forte

What did the Parthenon look like in the 5th century BCE? How spectacular was the view of the Giza Pyramids in third millennium BCE Egypt? The extraordinary growth of information and digital technologies in archaeology raises new questions about research methodology, knowledge and the dissemination of culture. In particular, the technologies of 3D data recording and representation such as computer vision, photogrammetry, and 3D laser scanning create information that has a complexity unimaginable a few years ago and whose codes of representation still must be defined and investigated. We do not adequately understand the cognitive processes that connect the geometric complexity of models with their representation. The key element on which we construct our codes, our maps, is the perception which first selects what is high-priority information and then transforms it into knowledge. The course aims explores these multidisciplinary issues, methods and technologies in the field of virtual and cyber archaeology and, more specifically, it is focused on the reconstruction and communication of the past through virtual reality and computer graphics.


ISIS 208: Virtual Form and Space

Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Nicola Lercari

Digital technologies, interactive media, and virtual environments are radically changing the cultural landscape of today’s societies. New forms of digital arts and cultures are the outcome of this change. In this studio course, students will explore both theoretical and practical approaches to digital arts and communication, by analyzing the relationship between virtuality and spatiality and by developing trans-disciplinary projects. In the seminar component students will focus on the artistic, socio-cultural, and technological dimensions of virtual worlds through interactive lectures and presentations. During the lab section students will engage in a number of hands-on activities on 3D modeling, mapping, avatar-based interaction design, and virtual environments creation. A fundamental part of Virtual Form and Space will be realized in OpenSimulator using the ISIS Sandbox virtual world.


CLST 724S: Roman Frontiers

Graduate Course
Instructor: Tolly Boatwright

This advanced graduate seminar explores life along the geographical peripheries of the Roman Empire, as well as the very concepts of Roman frontiers. We turn to archaeological, epigraphic, literary, numismatic, papyrological, and whatever other evidence we can find. Our goal is not simply to investigate diverse specific communities, cultures, or archaeological phenomena; we will also read and evaluate secondary scholarship, some using more theoretical approaches. This comparative, analytical work should enable us to see Roman data and concepts with fresh eyes.


VMS 338: Paris: A City and Its Culture 1850-1930

Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Neil McWilliam

This class looks at Paris as an urban space and as an artistic center. It explores the city as a physical environment that has to be understood in terms of varied populations, economic activities, and cultural representations. Viewing Paris as a subject for art as well as a major center for training and exhibition, the class will include a research project that uses new technologies to map the growth and development of artistic activity in the city.


VMS 551SL: Opening Archives: Materiality, Digitality, and Lives of Things

Graduate Course
Instructor: Mark Olson
Tuesdays, 6-9pm
Wired Lab / National Humanities Center

A renewed interest in materiality and “things” in contemporary humanistic discourse coincides with the growth of computer-based scholarly practices organized under the “big tent” of digital humanities. This course aims to explore the intersection of materiality and digitality in the humanities through a sustained practice of “critical making,” that is, hands-on exploration of new methods of mapping, modeling and visualizing historical material culture undertaken alongside critical contextualizations of these practices. Technologies include 3D modeling and acquisition, geospatial mapping, interactive game platforms, desktop fabrication, and gesture-based interfaces. No previous technical experience is required; a willingness to learn, however, is essential.

North Carolina State University


ADN 423/502: Digital Modeling

Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Patrick Fitzgerald
Mon/Wed, 1:30-4:15pm
203B Brooks Hall

COM 547: Mobile Technologies and Social Practices
Graduate Course
Instructor: Adriana Williamson
Thursdays, 1:30-4:15pm
205 Winston Hall

ENG 506: Verbal Data Analysis
Graduate Course
Instructor: Jason Swarts
Tues/Thurs 4:30-5:45pm
109 Tompkins Hall

ENG 582: Studies in Digital Humanities
Graduate Course
Instructor: Paul Fyfe
Tues/Thurs, 4:30-5:45pm
112 Tompkins Hall

GIS 410/510: Introduction to Geographic Information Science
Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Heather Cheshire
Thursdays, 5:40-7:30pm
1216 Jordan Hall

HI 599: Practicum in Digital History
Graduate Course
Instructor: Matthew Booker
Tuesdays, 6-9pm
Withers Hall 246 / National Humanities Center

University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill


AMST 202-001: Historical Approaches to American Studies

Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Seth Kotch
Mon/Wed/Fri, 2:00-2:50pm
Murphey 0204

A study of interdisciplinary methods and the concept of American studies with an emphasis on historical and cultural analysis.

AMST 850: Digital Humanities Practicum
Graduate Course
Instructor: Bobby Allen
Tuesdays, 6-8:50pm
TBD / National Humanities Center

This practicum blends traditional graduate seminar discussions with hands-on training and experience in the digital humanities. Students will work alongside DH practitioners in the Digital Innovation Lab, contributing to real-life projects that emphasize trans-domain, collaborative work. DIL projects share a commitment to engaged scholarship, representing partnerships with local communities. The practicum gives students the opportunity to pursue a set of professional development goals for themselves. Students will emerge from this practicum with a deeper understanding of digital humanities approaches, practices and issues, all of which will have be applied to their own project-based work and training.

Enrollment for this course is limited and is by permission of instructor. Please email Professor Allen with a statement of interest. Enrollment is open to MA and PHD students at UNC and (via interinstitutional registration) to graduate students at Duke, and NCSU. Disciplinary diversity is valued.

Additional details available here.

ANTH 419: Anthropological Application of GIS
Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Colin West
Tues/Thurs, 11am-12:15pm
Saunders 0322

COMM 431: Advanced Audio Production
Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Mark Robinson
Tues/Thurs, 12:30-1:45pm
Swain Hall 101A

COMM 638: Game Design
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Joyce Rudinski
Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:45am
Swain Hall 200A

COMM 654: Motion Graphics, Special Effects, and Compositing
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Edward Rankus
Mon/Wed 10-11:50am
Swain Hall 200A

COMM 850: Seminar in Media Studies
Graduate Course
Instructor: Torin Monahan
Mondays, 6-8:50pm
Caldwell 0208

COMP 410: Data Structures
Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Jodie Turnbull
Mon/Wed 11am-12:15pm
Sitterson 0014

COMP 411: Computer Organization
Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Montek Singh
Mon/Wed/Fri 1-2:15pm
F Brooks/Sitterson F009

COMP 416: Introduction to WWW Programming
Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Jodie Turnbull, Ketan Mayer-Patel
Tues/Thurs 2-3:15pm
Sitterson 0011

COMP 426: Advanced WWW Programming
Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Ketan Mayer-Patel
Tues/Thurs 12:30-1:45pm
Sitterson 0014

GEOG 491: Introduction to GIS
Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Stephen Walsh
Mon/Wed 3-5:30pm + Mon 1-1:50pm or Wed 2-2:30pm
Saunders 008/0322

HIST 671-001: Introduction to Public History
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Anne Whisnant
Wednesday, 5-7:50pm
Graham Memorial 0035

INLS 520: Organization of Information
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Denise Anthony
Tues/Thurs, 8-9:15am
Manning 208

INLS 520: Organization of Information
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Ryan Shaw
Tues/Thurs, 9:30-10:45a
Manning 208

INLS 523: Database Systems I
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Robert Capra
Tues/Thurs, 9:30-10:45a
Dey Hall 302

INLS 523: Database Systems I
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Javed Mostafa
Tues/Thurs, 11am-12:15pm
Manning 208

INLS 523: Database Systems I
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Stephanie Haas
Online

INLS 560: Programming for Information Professionals
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Elliot Hauser
Mon/Wed, 8-9:15am
Manning 117

INLS 572: Web Development I
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Joan Boone
Mon/Wed, 3-4:45pm
Manning 117

INLS 623: Database II
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Brad Hemminger
Mon/Wed, 11am-12:15pm
Manning 214

INLS 690-163: Intro to Big Data and NoSQL
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Rajasekar
Thursday, 5:30-8:15pm
Manning 304

INLS 720: Metadata
Graduate Course
Instructor: Jeff Pomerantz
Online

JOMC 581: Multimedia Design
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Laura Ruel
Tues/Thurs 1-2:50pm
Carroll 0059

JOMC 585: 3D Design Studio
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Spencer Barnes
Tues/Thurs 9-10:50am
Carroll 0059

JOMC 586: Intermediate Multimedia
Advanced Undergraduate & Graduate Course
Instructor: Steven King
Tues/Thurs 9-10:50am
Carroll 0060

JOMC 782: Multimedia Storytelling
Graduate Course
Instructor: Laura Ruel
Tues/Thurs 5-7:50pm
Carroll 0060