Fall 2012


Duke University


ISIS 240/AMI 325/VMS 288: Web-Based Multimedia Communications

Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Victoria Szabo (Monday), Florian Wiencek (Tuesday), Mark Olson (Thursday)
Monday, Tuesday or Thursday, 10:05am-12:35pm
Location TBD

Multimedia information systems, including presentation media, hypermedia, graphics, animation, sound, video, and integrated authoring techniques; underlying technologies that make them possible. Practice in the design innovation, programming, and assessment of web-based digital multimedia information systems. Intended for students in non-technical disciplines. Lab-based course.

ISIS 170/COMPSCI 107/VMS 172: Artificial Life, Culture, and Evolution
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Nick Gessler
Tues/Thurs, 10:05am-1pm
Link Classroom 6

Theory, practice and epistemology of computing and simulation. Creation of artificial models of life, culture, and evolution for prediction and exploration. Social processes embedded in simulation. Hands-on introduction to C++ to create and modify highly visual, sims with color and sound. Critical exploration of state-of-the-art multicausal, multiagent simulations. Topics include: cellular automata and emergence; human and non-human agency; self-organizing cultures. Historical and cultural contextualization through computer artifacts and applications in science and the arts, industry and entertainment, military and intelligence communities. No programming experience required.

ISIS 235.01/CULANTH 226.01: Espionage, Cryptology, Psyops
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Nick Gessler
Wednesday, 10:05am-12:55pm
Link Classroom 6

Explores cultural context of spies, codes and psychological operations from perspectives of anthropology, complexity and multiple agency, towards understanding how tradecrafts of intelligence and disinformation shaped, and continue to shape us and our information technologies. Work with historic and contemporary, previously classified and open sources, case studies and multimedia, including hands-on practice with propaganda leaflets, cryptographic machines and cryptanalysis, to explain the roles of networks of trust, secrecy and deception in cultural coevolution. No prerequisites.

ISIS 268.01/VMS 266.01: Media History: Old and New
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Victoria Szabo
Tues/Thurs, 10:05-11:20am
Carr TBD

Development of various media forms in historical and social contexts. Impact of old ¿new¿ media on established art, commerce, education, politics, entertainment from 19th c. on. Changing ideas about authenticity, authority, agency, reception, identity, and power relating to emerging media forms, production, circulation. Overlaps, disjunctures, convergences, persistences and antiquations via case studies and examples. Technologies include print publishing, photography, audio recording, film, telegraph, maps, exhibitions, architecture and installations alongside contemporary web, multimedia, database, game, virtual reality, and telepresence systems. Final rich media research project required.

ISIS 270S.01/COMPSCI 102S.01/VMS 287S.01: Immersive Virtual Worlds
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Mark McCahill
Thursday, 6:30-8:45pm
Smith Warehouse 228

Theory, practice, and creation of 3D virtual worlds. Hands-on design and development of online immersive synthetic social spaces with Croquet. Introduction to Smalltalk/Squeak programming and graphics workflow for creating virtual worlds and media assets. Critical exploration of state-of-the-art virtual world technologies; 3D graphics, text chat, voice, video, simulations, and mixed reality systems. Topics include: history and culture of virtual worlds, in-world identity and avatars; behavioral norms; self-organizing cultures; virtual world economies; architectural scalability. No prerequisites – some programming experience helpful. Consent of instructor required.

ISIS 351S.01/VMS 357.01/LIT 224S.01: Digital Storytelling
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Mastewal Mellese
Wed/Fri, 11:45am-1pm
Social Science 229 (TBD)

Digital storytelling methodologies, theory, and practice. In-depth analysis of digital storytelling in various media forms and modes of production. Cultural impact of new media narratives. Exploration of digital storytelling affordances: text, video, audio, design, animation, and interactivity. Hands-on experience developing digital narratives and creating digital critiques. No specific digital media authoring experience required.

ISIS 510S.01/VMS 566S.01: How They Got Game
Graduate and Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Tim Lenoir
Wednesday, 1:40-4:10pm
Smith Warehouse, Bay 4, C104

History and cultural impact of interactive simulations and video games. Evolution of computer and video game design from its beginnings to the present: storytelling, strategy, simulation, sports, 3D first-person games. Cultural, business, and technical perspectives. Insights into design, production, marketing, and socio-cultural impacts of interactive entertainment and communication. Students should have a dual processor implant with 1TB of VRAM. An FHI GreaterThanGames Lab course.

ISIS 590S.02/VMS 590S.06: Computational Cinematography
Graduate and Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Michael Young
Tues/Thurs, 1:25-2:40pm
Smith Warehouse, Bay 4, C104

Increasingly, cinematic content in games, machinima, cut scenes and interactive narrative is being created procedurally, that is, automatically by software. This course looks at the many disciplines that inform the construction of computational approaches to intelligent 3D camera control. The course will be in seminar format and cover relevant readings at the intersection of film studies (e.g., Edward Branigan), the psychology of film comprehension (e.g., Radvansky, Magliano, Zacks), philosophy of language (e.g., Grice, Searle), cinematography (e.g., Mascelli, Monaco) and intelligent camera control (Jhala, Bares, Seif El-Nasr, Christie). While the seminar is designed to engage students across many disciplines, the focus of the course will be on the development of an understanding of the algorithmic ways to do things with a camera. No programming will be required. Several projects will be required for the course; projects may take many forms, including but not limited to research papers, machinima pieces and/or software artifacts. An FHI GreaterThanGames Lab course.

North Carolina Central University


LSIS 5420: Introduction to Digital Libraries

Graduate Course
Instructor: Yoo-Lee
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 pm
LIB 218

LSIS 5451: Database Systems
Graduate Course
Instructor: Peterson
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 pm
LIB 325

LSIS 5820: Metadata Analysis
Graduate Course
Instructor: Swain
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 pm
LIB 338

LSIS 5425: Organization of Information
Graduate Course
Instructor: Yoo-Lee
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 pm
LIB 338

LSIS 5425: Organization of Information
Graduate Course
Instructor: Green
Online

LSIS 5425: Advanced Database Systems
Graduate Course
Instructor: Terrell
Online

LSIS 5835: Human Factors in System Design
Graduate Course
Instructor: Swain
Online

LSIS 5883: Graphical Representation
Graduate Course
Instructor: Terrell
Online

North Carolina State University


COM537: Gaming and Social Networks

Graduate Course
Instructor: Nick Taylor
Wednesday, 6-8:45pm
Winston Hall, Room 213

Exploration of inter-relations among mobile technologies (cell phones, PDAs), location-based activities, and playful/social spaces. Investigates: (1) the definition of basic gaming concepts (community, narrative, play, and space); (2) the history of games as social environments, with particular emphasis on multi-user domains (MUDs); and (3) the definition of games, which use the physical space as the game environment, such as pervasive games, location-based games, and hybrid reality games. Discussion of inter-connections among games, education, and art. By permission of department.

ENG 583/CRD 791: Digital Media Theory
Graduate Course
Instructor: David Rieder
Wednesday, 6-8:45pm
Winston Hall, Room 17

University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill


COMP 380: Computers and Society

Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Tessa Nicholas
Tues/Thurs, 9:30-10:45AM
Sitterson Room 0014

COMP 590: Experimental Digital Studio
Graduate Course
Instructor: Tessa Nicholas
Tues/Thurs, 11am-12:15PM

HIST 292: African American and White Memory in the American South
Undergraduate Course
Instructor: W. Fitzhugh Brundage
Mon/Wed/Fri, 1-1:50pm
Venable G307

HIST 671-001: Introduction to Public History
Graduate & Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Anne Whisnant
Wednesday, 5-7:50pm
Greenlaw 0317

INLS 490-188: User Experience Design
Graduate & Undergraduate Course
Instructor: Velasco-Martin
Tuesday, 12:30-3:15pm
Alumni 308

INLS 520: Organization of Information
Graduate Course
Instructor: Jane Greenberg
Monday, 12:30-3:15pm
Manning 307

INLS 520: Organization of Information
Graduate Course
Instructor: Sarah Ramdeen
Mon/Wed, 3:30-4:45pm
Manning 304

INLS 523: Database Systems I
Graduate Course
Instructor: Arcot Rajasekar
Mon/Wed, 2-3:15pm
Murphey 222

INLS 523: Database Systems I
Graduate Course
Instructor: Javed Mostafa
Tues/Thurs, 11am-12:15pm
Manning 307

INLS 523: Database Systems I
Graduate Course
Instructor: Joan Boone
Wednesday, 12:30-3:15pm
Manning 117

INLS 572: Web Development I
Graduate Course
Instructor: Joan Boone
Thursday, 2-4:45pm
Manning 117

INLS 613: Text Mining
Graduate Course
Instructor: Jaime Arguello
Mon/Wed, 2-3:15pm
Manning 304

INLS 623: Database II
Graduate Course
Instructor: Brad Hemminger
Mon/Wed, 11am-12:15pm
Manning 304

INLS 720: Metadata
Graduate Course
Instructor: Jane Greenberg
Wednesday, 12:30-3:15pm
Manning 208

INLS 723: Database III
Graduate Course
Instructor: Arcot Rajasekar
Mon/Wed, 11am-12:15pm
Manning 214

INLS 890-186: Making the Humanities Digital
Graduate Course
Instructor: Ryan Shaw
Tuesday, 6-8:45pm
Manning 304

JOMC 491-007: Mobile App Design and Development
Graduate & Undergraduate Course
Instructors: Paul Jones/Chris Davis
Tues/Thurs, 5-6:15pm
Carroll Hall 60